Criminal Justice Major

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Courses

The Majors and Minors section of the academic catalog explains graduation requirements. You can also read more about courses in the Undergraduate Course Listings section of the academic catalog.

Degree Plans

Sample degree plans provide a glimpse of what your schedule may look like as you complete this program.

Criminal Justice Major Courses

SOCI101 Principles of Sociology (3 Credits)
SOC 101 Principles of Sociology Three Credits A basic course introducing the student to the concepts, theories, and methods employed in an objective scientific analysis of society, culture, social institutions and organizations, social control, deviancy, and social factors involved in personality development. (Offered every semester.)
SOCI202 Statistics (3 Credits)
A study of basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics. The areas of study will include graphic representations, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, and various significant tests of relationship, including measures of association, correlation, linear relationship, and means tests. This course includes an introduction to multivariate statistics and non-parametrics. Cross listed with PSYC and SCWK 202. Meets Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Offered every semester.)
CRJS203 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 Credits)
An advanced survey course focusing on the description and interrelationships of the many agencies and institutions which comprise criminal justice; e.g., justice systems, law enforcement, corrections, etc. Agencies and institutions will be studied in their historical and social contexts, and will be further examined by way of major theories and models of criminal justice. The various professional implications of criminal justice will be examined. Cross listed with SOCI 201. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered spring semester.)
SOCI210 Research Methods (3 Credits)
A study of problem formulation, data collection, data analysis including descriptive and inferential statistical techniques, and research report writing. Includes two or more applied projects, usually in collaboration with the entire class or with a group, and the development of a publication-ready research paper. Prerequisites: SOC 101, 202 (may be taken concurrently). (Offered fall semester.)
SOCI303 Crime and Social Deviancy (3 Credits)
SOC 303 Crime and Social Deviancy Three Credits A social and social psychological approach to the study of disvalued persons and behavior. Theoretical approaches to causes and control of deviant behavior are studied with a major emphasis placed on crime and criminals. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of the instructor. (Offered fall semester of even calendar years.)
SOCI304 Social Psychology (3 Credits)
This course presents an introduction to Social Psychology by exploring theories and research related to social perceptions, social influence, and social relations. Major topics to be covered in the course include, but are not limited to, social influence processes, interpersonal attraction, group behavior, aggression, conformity, and attitude formation and change. Students will further explore these topics by designing and conducting a social psychological research project. Cross listed with SOC304. Prerequisites: PSY 101, SOC 101, PSY or SOC 202, and PSY 210 or SOC 210. (Offered fall semester.)
CRJS351 Juvenile Delinquency (3 Credits)
A course designed to investigate delinquency, including juvenile deviancy and juvenile crime. Applicable theories and models of delinquency will be investigated, as will social construction of delinquency. The course is appropriate for the students focussing on criminal justice generally as well as social work. Professional implications will also be examined. Cross listed with SOC 351 and SWK 351. Prereq: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester of odd calender years)
SOCI371 Professional Seminar II (1 Credit)
SOC 371 Professional Seminar II One Credit This course has identical requirements to SOC 271, but assignments (which typically prepare the student for SOC 471), need to be completed at a higher stage of development. Additionally each student is required to produce one of two professional products. One option would be to write an academic paper which will be submitted to a journal or a professional organization, and the other would be to complete an applied leadership project which demonstrates significant and innovative leadership with a campus or community organization, including the implementation and presentation of a successful applied idea, innovation or intervention, tailor-made to that organization. Typically taken during the junior or senior year. Prerequisite: SOC 271. (Offered fall semester.)
SOCI380 Social Theory (3 Credits)
SOC 380 Sociological Theory Three Credits ( WI ) The development of major schools of social thought, major social theorists and their distinctive contributions to the understanding of the society, culture, and modernity, are considered and analyzed. Requires three of four major papers which focus respectively on social philosophers of antiquity, the major founders of sociological theory, modern social theories and theoretical trends and everyday applications of social theory. Also covers how to write a "literature review" for a research paper. Meets the general education writing-intensive requirement. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester.)
CRJS405 Practicum (3 Credits)
Each student must successfully complete one or more practicum experiences totaling 6-8 hours of academic credit where 40 clock hours on location equals one hour of credit. Ideally each practicum should be based on a criminal justice afflicted agency (court, probation office, correctional facility, local police station or sheriff's department, etc.), which specialized in some aspect of the criminal justice system. Ideally an on-site supervisor with an appropriate degree or license will supervise the student's practicum. Prereq: SOC 101, 202, 210, CRJ 201 and upper division status.
Cross-Cultural Courses - Complete One Additional Cross-Cultural Course (Courses Required: 2)
HIST110 Latin America (3 Credits)
Emphasizes the forces that shaped and are now reshaping the region. Examines historical reasons for the present problems that trouble the area. Cross listed with HIST310 and SPAN310. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. (Offered fall semester.)
SOCI112 Intro To Anthropology (3 Credits)
The scientific study of humanity, human origins, fossil forms, and the evolution of material and non-material culture. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. Prerequisite: SOC 101 is recommended. (Offered spring semester.)
EDUC202 Cultural Awareness in the (3 Credits)
The purpose of this course is to explore race and poverty issues that impact the classroom environment. Candidates will search for effective strategies to better meet the needs of underserved populations. The hidden rules of economic class and characteristics of generational poverty will be studied, with emphasis on the impact this has on instruction. Students spend 40 hours assisting in a classroom which serves a high minority and low socioeconomic population. Prerequisite: EDU 101. (Offered every Interterm.) IN16 - $60 Fee
HIST202 Eastern Civilization (3 Credits)
The study of the history and culture of China and Japan from ancient times to the present. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. (Offered spring semester.)
HIST225 African American History (3 Credits)
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
HIST226 African American History (3 Credits)
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
EDUC202 Cultural Awareness in the (3 Credits)
HIST245 Jews, Christians, Muslims (3 Credits)
A study of the history, culture and texts of Jews, Christians and Muslims based upon an examination of the significance of monotheism, Scripture, authority, ritual, family life, ethics, material culture, within each group. Observation of concepts and phenomena they share, as well as the ways they are distinguished for the purpose of understanding each group's origin, development, influence, and connection to civil/political orders. Cross listed with REL 245. Meets the general educaion cross cultural requirement. Prerequisite: COR 102 (may be taken concurrently) or Bible course or permission of instructor. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
THEO245 Jews, Christians, Muslims (3 Credits)
REL 245 Jews, Christians, Muslims Three Credits A study of the history, culture, and texts of Jews, Christians, and Muslims based upon an examination of the significance of monotheism, Scripture, authority, ritual, family life, ethics, material culture, within each group. Observation of concepts and phenomena they share, as well as the ways they are distinguished for the purpose of understanding each group's origin, development, influence, and connection to civil/political orders. Cross listed with HST 245. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. Prerequisite: COR 102 or 301 or Bible course or permission of instructor. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
ENGL246 Contemporary Cross-Cultural Lit (3 Credits)
An introduction to the literature of a cultural group other than the predominant culture group of the United States. Each time the course is offered it may examine a different literature. The different topics studied could range from African-American Literature to Chinese Literature to Irish Literature to Latin American Literature, but the course will always focus on introducing students to a variety of genres through an exploration of a different culture's literary productions. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. Course may be repeated due to study of different topics. Prerequisite: ENG 105. (Offered spring semester) FA12 Topic - Irish Literature
HIST248 History of Mexico (3 Credits)
This course seeks to increase awareness of the uniqueness of Mexican culture, society, and politics and to promote an understanding of the forces driving changes in these areas. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. Prerequisite: HST101. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
SOCI302 Diversity Issues (3 Credits)
The status of "minority group" is defined and dominant-subdominant relationships in society are examined. The value and challenges of diversity in a pluralistic society are presented. An emphasis is placed on the social factors traditionally included under diversity (e.g. race, ethnicity, deviant lifestyles), and non-traditional factors (religion, social class, geographic setting, etc.). Techniques for resolving problems as well as patterns of adaptation are considered. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. Cross listed with SCWK302. (Offered irregularly.)
COMM307 Interpersonal Communication (3 Credits)
The study of the advanced aspects of interpersonal communication as it occurs in friendships, families, professional relationships, leadership roles, gender differences and sameness, and small groups. The student will explore in a more in-depth manner goals, roles, strategies, messages, conflict, perceptions, and listening as they are applied toward successful verbal and nonverbal communication in males, females, and cultures across borderlands. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
HIST310 Latin America (3 Credits)
Emphasizes the forces that shaped and are now reshaping the region. Examines historical reasons for the present problems that trouble the area. Cross listed with HIST110 and SPAN 310. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. (Offered fall semester.)
SPAN310 Latinoamerica y Su Civilizacion (3 Credits)
Emphasizes the forces that shaped and are now reshaping the region. Examines historical reasons for the present problems that trouble the area. Cross listed with HST 310. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. Prerequisite: SPN 201 or equivalent. (Offered in a three year rotation.)
ENGL318 Cross-Cultural Studies for TESOL (3 Credits)
This course focuses on the dynamic relationship between language, communication, and culture. Students will study how cultural differences between communities and within communities affect the communication process and the language choices people make. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 214. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
SPAN320 España y Su Civilización (3 Credits)
Discussion and reading in Spanish of history, literature, art, and customs. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. Prerequisite: SPN 201 or equivalent. (Offered in a three year rotation.)
HIST325 African American History (3 Credits)
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
HIST326 African American History (3 Credits)
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
HIST348 History of Mexico (3 Credits)
This course seeks to increase awareness of the uniqueness of Mexican culture, society, and politics and to promote an understanding of the forces driving changes in these areas. Meets the general educastion cross cultural requirement. Prerequisite: HST101 and a History major. (Offered spring semster of even calendar years.)
ENGL348 Contemporary Literary Visions (3 Credits)
This course is a multi-genre exploration of contemporary literature that looks at trends and innovations in literature written in the last few decades. students will be encouraged to deepen their reading, writing, and analysis skills through an in-depth exploration of contemporary literature from multiple cultural traditions. Prerequisite: ENG201. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
ARTH351 Historical Survey of Women Artists (3 Credits)
This course is designed to provide an introduction of the accomplishments of western and non-western women artists from antiquity to the 20th century, which are often omitted from the art history canon. The course will cover historical epochs focusing on the social, economi, and demographic factors that had a direct bearing on women's potential to become professional artists. Meets the general education fine arts and cross cultural requirement. (offered spring semester of odd calendar years) (meets gen ed-humanities and CC)
BUSN351 International Business (3 Credits)
Students will understand the forces of globalization, why nations trade, problems of trade restrictions and international payments, and multinational corporations as international change agents. They will work from the manager's perspective to discover how working internationally affects the functional areas of business through influences of the land, the political environment, and the cultural heritage of the people. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. Prerequisite: Open to any upper division student. (Offered spring semester.)
HIST353 History of Russia (3 Credits)
This course examines the development of Russian poitics, religion and culture from the prehistoric period to the present. This allows study of a culture which is connected to the European societies with which students are familiar, but which has been strikingly different in may ways. Prerequisite: HST 101. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
PHIL354 World Religions (3 Credits)
Students will study nine of the great religious traditions of the world descriptively and will engage in a comparative study of these traditions with an emphasis upon the unique characteristics of Christianity. Attention will be given to ways of communicating the Gospel to persons loyal to non-Christian religious traditions. Cross listed with REL354. Meets cross-cultural gen ed requirement. Prerequisite: COR 102 or 301. (Offered fall semester.)
THEO354 World Religions (3 Credits)
Students will study nine of the great religious traditions of the world descriptively and will engage in a comparative study of these traditions with an emphasis upon the unique characteristics of Christianity. Attention will be given to ways of communicating the Gospel to persons loyal to non-Christian religious traditions. Cross-listed with PHL354. Meets cross-cultural gen ed requirement. Prerequisite: COR 102 or 301. (Offered fall semester.)
ARTH355 Art History: Non-western Art (3 Credits)
A general survey of the architecture and artifacts developed in cultures not influenced by Western artistic tradition including Africa, India, China, Japan, Korea, the South Sea Islands, Australia, South and Central America, and Native North America. Attention will be given to the relationship of social, political, intellectual, and religious developments that impacted the making of artifacts. Meets the general education cross cultural and fine arts requirements. (Offered fall semester of even calendar years.)
SOCI360 Sociology Of Cities (3 Credits)
SOC 360 Sociology of Cities Three Credits ( CC ) This course allows students to study the city as a unique form of social organization and as the highest and most complex product of human civilization. Students will learn about the historical development of cities in global perspective, about the current state of urban affairs, and about the complex interdependencies of ecological, economic, and social systems. One field trip to a nearby city will allow students to see urban systems in action. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. Prerequisite: SOC 101, 112, PSY 101, or SWK 205. (Offered fall semester every three years.)
THEO361 The Church in the City (3 Credits)
This class explores the Biblical, theological, and sociological dimensions of the urban church. Themes discussed include: theology of church and kingdom, seeking the shalom of the city, ministry to the poor, and confronting the principalities and powers. (Offered irregularly) IN15 - This year's cities of focus will be St. Louis, Chicago, and Austin. Fee - $500 IN14 - This travel/experience course explores the biblical, theological, and sociological dimensions of the urban church by actually visiting them and interviewing persons connected to those churches. Themes discussed include: theology of church and kingdom, seeking the "shalom" of the city, ministry to the poor, and confronting the "principalities and powers" that affect the church and its ministry. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. In 2014, the class will explore several Western cities, including St. Louis, Denver, Salt Lake City, Spokane. Extended time will be spent in Seattle under the direction of former professor Dr. Joe Culumber. Fee - $600.
BUSN351 International Business (3 Credits)
Students will learn about leadership formation and setting an organization’s strategic direction, aligning structure to implement strategy, and leading individuals within the firm as they explore the similarities and differences in leadership formation and use between the United States and Brazil. The course allows students to recognize and use social structures, which vary around the world, to identify opportunities to create value, mobilize resources, and deliver value. On-site visits to profit and not-for-profit organizations in San Paulo and Rio De Janeiro, along with class discussions, will provide opportunities to understand leadership formation, basic principles and practical examples. Students will observe and evaluate the influence of leadership on high-performance teams, corporate culture, organizational reputations, strategic change, business best practices, communication of vision, and operation integration across business units. Fulfills the BUSN351 and cross cultural requirement.
Choose CRJS489 or 390 (Courses Required: 1)
CRJS390 Individual Readings (1 Credit)
Selected Readings in an area not covered by course offerings, often in the general topic area of the chosen senior project. Annotated bibliography, reading notes, and a comprehensive research paper required. Cross listed with SOC 390 and SWK 390. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CRJ 471. (Variable credit 1-3 cr.)
CRJS489 Departmental Honors Research (1 Credit)
Choose Two Courses - From CRJS230, 270 or 275 (Courses Required: 2)
CRJS230 Criminal Law (3 Credits)
This course is an introduction to the study of criminal law in the United States, and does not cover any specific federal or state law. Topics include the reliance of U.S. law on the Constitution and peripherally on the Declaration of Independence, the relationship of criminal law to civil law, U.S. criminal law and its relation to British common law, principles of criminal law, principles of criminal liability, complicity, inchoate crimes, defenses, justifications and excuses, crimes against persons, crimes against property, crimes against public order, and crimes against the state. Prerequisite: CRJ 201. (Offered every third year.)
CRJS270 Law Enforcement (3 Credits)
It is the goal of this course to devlop a greater understanding of the complexities of the law enforcement function-its intricacies and diversity. This will be done through a thoughtful consideration of the structure and functions of law enforcement and through exploring the topics of police and police functions. Prerequisites: CRJ 201 and SOC 101. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
CRJS275 Corrections (3 Credits)
This class will introduce students to a critical study of corrections-the institutionalized system through which society incarcerates or otherwise punishes and supervisers individuals identified as criminals. The course will consider the correctional system, with particular attention to the social forces that shape and are shaped by corrections. The course will focus on models and trends in corrections with application for both understanding society and preparation for practice. Prerequisites: CRJ 201 and SOC 101. (Offered fall semester of even calendar years.)

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