Elementary Education Major

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Courses

Visit the Online Undergraduate Catalog for an explanation of graduation requirements.

The elementary education major is a program designed to prepare individuals to teach first through sixth grade, and requires students to complete 87 credits.  Students completing this major are eligible for the bachelor of science degree.

 

 

Elementary Education Major Courses

This course will help students to produce enough to support themselves and family, consume resources and products wisely, provide for their own future needs, support government's appropriate role in our productivity, and consider the needs of their children, and enable them to live productive lives. (Offered fall semester.)
A basic introduction to the post-digital/post-media theory and practice of public speaking, media communication and speech communication. The proliferation of platforms and a general decentering of who can speak (through social media) changes the way individuals communicate and changes the systems of communication individuals find themselves in. The goal of this course is to help broaden the student's knowledge of the entire systems and processes of Communication so that they become more skillful as an initiator and recipient of messages.
The student is introduced to a variety of topics pertinent to health-related fitness. These include methods of training for cardiovascular fitness, muscular strenth, strength and flexibility, nutrition, stress management, and chronic disease. (Offered every semester.)
A continuation of Physical Fitness I, this course engages students in activities that afford health-related fitness. Students plan and execute a personal cardiovascular training program and participate in student based discussions of current wellness literature. BIO 113 Health (2 credits) may be taken in place of HPR 102 for physical education majors only. Prerequisite: HPR 101. (Offered every semester.)
Study of why the world works the way it does, how its unique regions have taken shape, and how those regions are increasingly interconnected. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
A writing intensive course with special attention to the uses of expository writing and group discussion in interrogating culture, a sense of self, and one's calling. Through discussion of both fiction and non-fiction texts, students enhance the critical thinking ability required for meaningful academic communication (both written and oral) within the disciplines. Emphasis given to the development of thesis statements, logical organization, and the honest and effective use of sources in summary, analysis, and argument. Students should complete this course during their first year. (Offered every semester.)
PHY 105 Planets and Stars - Three Credits A wealth of information has been collected about our Sun and Solar System, surprising us with the richness and variety of geological environments scattered among the planets and their moons. In-depth studies of the Sun and the planets of our solar system will begin with investigations of Earth - our home planet. Exploration of our Sun, Earth and Solar System involves a variety of tools that scientists use to gain information, generate hypotheses, and draw conclusions about the characteristics and processes in our system and extending into the rest of the Universe. In the process of investigations and discussions in this course, students will gain an awareness of both the power and limitations of scientific inquiry. In the laboratory investigations, students will be introduced to Earth processes and materials, extension of Earth processes/materials to the rest of the Solar System, nighttime live-sky observing, use of star maps, identification of constellations/stars, basic telescope operations, and basic astrophotography. Two hours of lecture and two hours of evening lab each week - However, because of the limited availability of clear skies due to unpredictable weather conditions, the student will need to be somewhat flexible about accomplishing the lab activities, with occasional adjustments necessary to do observations that will extend beyond the scheduled days and hours listed. (Offered Fall Semester Only)
This is the first mathematics course where the content of grades K-5 is carefully studies. Fundamental properties underlying the structure of numeration systems and various algorithms for computation are stressed. Basic algebra and problem solving is also reviewed and examined. This course is required of early childhood, elementary, and special education majors. This course does not count towards the mathematics major, and both MTH 143 and 144 are required in order to fulfill the general education quantitative reasoning requirement.
This is the second mathematics course where the content of grades K-5 is carefully studies. Topics include geometry, measurement, problem solving, probability, and statistics are stressed. This course is required of early childhood, elementary, and special education majors. This course does not count towards the mathematics major, and both MTH 143 and 144 are required in order to fulfill the general education quantitative reasoning requirement.
This course is designed to equip potential elementary teachers with the necessary mathematical content knowledge for successful mathematical instruction at the elementary school level. The course will emphasise the Illinois State Board of Education content standards for College Algebra and Statistics. The course does not count toward a mathematical major or fulfill the general education mathematics requirement. Prerequisite: MTH 143 and 144. (Offered spring semester.)
This course examines the settlement, colonization and nation-building of the United States from roughly 1600-1865. This course focuses on the context in which European settlers and the Africans whom they enslaved built a nation, wresting North America from native tribes. We will investigate the loyalties that guided settlers' beliefs and actions; the multi-faceted conflicts that led future generations to demand liberty; and the conflicted notions of equality, democracy and justice that guided the United States in its first eight decades. (Offered fall semester.)
Examines structures, functions, and policies of the national government. (Offered spring semester.)
An elementary study of the formal and historical aspects of architecture, sculpture, painting, and music, and an examination of their relation to Western civilization at its high points. Prerequisite: ENG 101 (Offered every semester.)
The content of this course focuses on using art, music, and movement to enhance student learning in the elementary classroom core curriculum. The course includes the study of tools, techniques, and technology of art, music, and movement. It provides candidates an understanding of the educational, communicative, and aesthetic values of dance, music, and visual arts and the role fine arts plays in reflecting history and culture. Field experiences required. (Offered every semester.)
A course in the reading sequence designed to acquaint candidates with a variety of reading programs and approaches used in contemporary elementary school classrooms. Emphasis is on the reading process and product from the early stages of readiness through adolescence. Attention is given to strategies that aide in word identification such as using sight words, phonics, contextual analysis, and structural analysis. Attention is given to comprehension fostering strategies. Specific strategies for Content Area Reading are examined as well as strategies to be used with ESL students and Special Needs students. Field experiences required. Meets the general education writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. (Offered every semester.)
Emphasis is on the identification and remediation of reading problems at the elementary school level. Prevention of reading problems through early intervention is addressed. Informal assessment and teaching strategies are stressed. Field experiences required. Prerequisite: EDUC 312 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. (Offered every semester.)
A comprehensive survey of the various types of poetry and prose for children, with considerable attention to the significant historical and folklore backgrounds. Prerequisite: ENG 201 or 243 or consent of instructor. (Offered every semester.)
This course explores methods and materials used in the teaching of the language arts at the elementary school level. Emphasis is placed on speaking skills, critical listening skills, using literature across the curriculum, and the writing process which includes grammar, spelling, handwriting, and word processing. Attention is given to writing in the Content Areas. Strategies to be used with ESL students are also presented. The integration of technology, diversity in the classroom, critical thinking skills, and assessment and evaluation are also examined. Field experiences required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. (Offered every semester.)
This course explores methods, materials, and techniques used in the teaching of social studies at the elementary school level. Emphasis is placed on the social studies goals, writing objectives and lesson plans, assessment procedures, and the integration of other curricular areas. Critical and creative thinking skills are examined as they apply to the goals of social studies and planning. Cultural diversity, the integration of technology, and small group activities are also explored. Field experiences required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. (Offered every semester.)
The course examines effective teaching strategies for teaching mathematics to elementary school students. It emphasizes placing students in a role where they actively think, reason, problem solve, and make sense of an inquiry-oriented, problem solving classroom environment. Students will examine children's strategies for making sense of various mathematical concepts and consider means of facilitating the development of these strategies. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and an appropriate mathematics course which may be taken concurrently. (Offered every semester.)
This course examines strategies for teaching science to elementary school students. The students will be exploring the nature of inquiry and strategies for promoting, supporting, and assessing students' scientific inquiry. This course will seek to provide students with instructional tools to help children develop conceptual understanding of scientific concepts. Students will examine strategies for questioning, sequencing of lessons, assessing students' understanding, meeting students' needs in multi-ability settings, and involving more girls and minorities. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. (Offered every semester.)
Curriculum, evaluation, administration, and an understanding of child characteristics as related to motor learning. (Offered spring semesterl.)
Designed to provide prospective teachers with experience in formulating individualized performance objectives, key teaching and therapy skills, and programming for specific problems in organization and administration of students with disabilities. Provides a brief review of the legislative and history of adapted physical education. (Offered spring semester.)
This course deals with the basic principles of biology. Consideration is given to cell biology and structural and functional organization of plants and animals. Principles of reproduction, genetics, and ecology are introduced as well as a brief survey of the kingdoms of living organisms. Beginning course for all biology majors. (Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.) (Offered fall semester.)
Major emphases in this course are placed on the anatomy and physiology of flowering plants. Also included are agricultural and horticultural applications, and an overview of the plant kingdom. Meets the general education laboratory science requirement. (Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.) (Offered fall semester.)
PHY102 Energy and the Environment - Three or Four Credits Principles and ideas from elementary science are applied to the broad topics of energy, pollution, and transportation. The student should gain an awareness of some of the major environmental problems and develop a basis for understanding the complexity of the problems. Introductory physical processes are introduced so that this course not only counts toward a graduation science requirement, but also serves as a foundation for other science courses. Three hours lecture and optional two hours lab each week. Students enrolling in and successfully completing the lab will receive four credits; students not enrolled in the lab will receive three credits for the class. To take the class, students must be concurrently enrolled in the lecture part of the class. (Offered spring semester)
The course covers general and fundamental areas of physical sciences that are important to educators. The topics deal with basic modern physics including Einstein’s relativity theory, nano-technology, quantum physics, and the modern ideas of atoms, molecules, stars, planets, astrophysics, and cosmology.
This course prepares the candidate for admission to Teacher Education. Course content includes the characteristics of the Greenville University Teacher Education Program, a survey of the legal, social and ethical issues involved in public school education, an introduction to program portfolio development, and a correlation of psychological principles to varied learning styles and milieus. This course is conducted on campus and includes field experience in school settings that have a large minority population. This course will give students the opportunity to determine whether they want to persist in the Teacher Education Program. (Offered fall semester for transfer students and students with special needs by permission of instructor, and offered every Interterm for freshmen.) Pre-requisite: signature of instructor IN15 - $92 Fee.
The purpose of this course is to explore race and poverty issues that impact the classroom environment. Candidates will search for effective strategies to better meet the needs of underserved populations. The hidden rules of economic class and characteristics of generational poverty will be studied, with emphasis on the impact this has on instruction. Students will spend time assisting in a classroom which serves a high minority and low socioeconomic population. This course meets the general education global foundations requirement. Prerequisite: EDUC 101. (Offered every Interterm.) IN18 - $60 Fee
This course will examine the historical context, diverse characteristics, and individual planning for the exceptional child. Students in this course will explore how individuals develop and learn within the context of their cultural, linguistic, and academic experiences. Co-teaching instructional plans based on diverse student characteristics, student performance data, and curriculum goals will be developed. Thirty hours of field experience in a special education classroom are required. Prerequisite: EDU 101. (Offered every semester.)
This course will provide a current and comprehensive overview of research and theory related to human learning. The course will emphasize major concepts of learning theory but will also cover relevant motivational and developmental theories. The course will underscore the relationship between theory, research, and practice. Prerequisite: EDUC101; Corequisite: EDUC280. (Offered every term.)
This course will investigate the structures of a safe and healthy learning environment that facilitates cultural and linguistic responsiveness, positive social interaction, active engagement, and academic risk-taking. A three tiered level of positive behavior supports (PBS) will be explored as a framework for creating plans to accomplish a productive learning environment. Twenty hours of field experience required. Prerequisite: EDU280
After admission to the professional internship , candidates receive student teaching placements. Candidates work with their cooperating teachers during the first week of school. Five days of clinical experience required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Internship. (Offered fall semester)
This course is a general methods course to prepare candidates for teaching at the elementary level. It is conducted with a amajor emphasis on actual clinical experiences focusing on the role of the elementary school teacher within the community, school, and classroom. Methods and techniques of classroom management, lesson planning, student assessment, and reporting are also considered, as candidates work with clinical instructors. As part of this clinical experience, students will complete a practice edTPA. Professional ethics and dispositions are also covered.
A capstone course offered in conjunction with EDUC 404, Professional Internship (Student Teaching).
For candidates completing the elementary program. Fifteen weeks of student teaching are required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Internship. (Offered every semester.)

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