Christian Higher Education Since 1892
Brian Hartley

Brian Hartley

Dean of the School of the Liberal Arts and Sciences, Professor of Religion

Year Started at GC: 1993
Phone: (618) 664-6821
Email: brian.hartley@greenville.edu
Personal Website: religionprofessor.blogspot.com/

Publications and Presentations

"Media, Mystery, and Audience Myths," at the North American Academy of Liturgy, Montreal, PQ, Canada, January, 2012.

"The Challenge of Worship in the Free Methodist Church: A White Paper for the Study Commission on Doctrine," prepared for the 2011 General Conference of the Free Methodist Church of North America.

"The Liturgy of the Hours: Some Reflections from an Evangelical Wesleyan," in Sacramental Life 21.3 (Summer, 2009): 17-22.

"The Liturgical Reordering of the Ecclesia Anglicana: Faithful Understanding in the Elizabethan Homilies of 1563," Anglican Episcopal History 76.4 (2007): 489-519.

"Understanding the Authority of the Elizabethan Homilies," Proceedings of the North American Academy of Liturgy (2007): 88-117.

"Disinterring the Bones of John Foxe: Suffering in the Acts and Monuments as Weapon in Ecclesiastical Definition," at the Wesleyan Theological Society, Kankakee, IL, March, 2007.

"The Queen and her Homilies: Resolving the Problem of Theological Authority in the British Reformation," at the North American Academy of Liturgy, Toronto, Canada, January, 2007.

"'Tuning the Pulpits': Forming the Faithful by Fiat (or, Sermons in the Service of the Virgin Queen)," lecture delivered at the Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural Research, St. John's University and School of Theology, Collegeville, MN, October 26, 2006.

“Wesley, Tradition, and the Homilies,” lecture delivered at Tyndale Seminary, Toronto, Canada, May 31, 2005.

"Sixteenth Century Predecessors of John Wesley: Intimations of Eucharistic Ecclesiology in the Elizabethan Homilies of 1563,” paper presented at the annual meeting of the Wesleyan Theological Society, Seattle Pacific University, March, 2005.
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Review of John Wyclif: Scriptural Logic, Real Presence, and the Parameters of Orthodoxy by Ian Christopher Levy. Review of Biblical Literature ( October 23, 2004).
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Web article for the Folger Shakespeare Library, “Eucharist,” from the NEH Seminar, “Sites of Cultural Stress from Reformation to Revolution,” September 2004:
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Professional Affiliations

North American Academy of Liturgy;
Wesleyan Theological Society;
American Academy of Religion;
Society of Biblical Literature;
Order of Saint Luke

Related Experiences

Book Review Editor, Sacramental Life
Scholar-in-Residence, Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural Research, St. John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota
Preaching Pastor, St. Paul's Free Methodist Church
Chair and Convener, Preaching Seminar ("Word in Worship"), North American Academy of Liturgy.

About Brian Hartley

What's your favorite thing about working at Greenville College?

My favorite thing about working at GC is the chance it gives me to be a part of a working Christian academic community. While we oftentimes joke about the word, "community," it really does represent who we are and what we aim to be. Within the scope of this community, we seek to bring along students into the rigors of asking the most important and lifelong questions and we have the audacity to believe that this is crucial to the task of reconciling the entire creation back to God through Christ.

What attracted you to the Religion Department, and how do you use it outside of the classroom?

I function not only as a professor but as an ordained minister-and I find these two roles to be compatible though they require me to make adjustments in each. I was attracted to teaching partly because of my own experience as both an undergraduate and graduate student, but more so because it allows me to continue to research and think through what I consider to be the most important questions one may ask-questions about God, the world, and the very meaning of life. As an historical theologian, I oftentimes remark that most of my best friends are dead (that is, I have textual companions that stretch back thousands of years). And, I make it my goal to introduce my students to many of these friends as lifelong traveling companions on the Christian journey of faith. I also attempt to model in my own life and ministry a sense of balance and order that embraces the everyday, ordinary, and mundane as essential elements of God's good creation.

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