Christian Higher Education Since 1892

History Education Major

0

Courses

The Majors and Minors section of the academic catalog explains graduation requirements. You can also read more about courses in the Undergraduate Course Listings section of the academic catalog.

Degree Plans

Sample degree plans provide a glimpse of what your schedule may look like as you complete this program.

History Education Major Courses

Professional Education
EDUC101 Introduction to Education (3 Credits)
EDU 101 Introduction to Educational Practice Three Credits This course prepares the candidate for admission to Teacher Education. Course content includes the characteristics of the Greenville College Teacher Education Program, a survey of the legal, social and ethical issues involved in public school education, an introduction to LiveText and program portfolio development, and a correlation of psychological principles to varied learning styles and milieus. This course is conducted on campus and includes 70 hours of field experience in school settings that have a large minority population. This course will give students the opportunity to determine whether they want to persist in the Teacher Education Program. (Offered fall semester for transfer students and students with special needs by permission of instructor, and offered every Interterm for freshmen.) Pre-requisite: signature of instructor IN15 - $92 Fee.
EDUC202 Cultural Awareness in the (3 Credits)
The purpose of this course is to explore race and poverty issues that impact the classroom environment. Candidates will search for effective strategies to better meet the needs of underserved populations. The hidden rules of economic class and characteristics of generational poverty will be studied, with emphasis on the impact this has on instruction. Students spend 40 hours assisting in a classroom which serves a high minority and low socioeconomic population. Prerequisite: EDU 101. (Offered every Interterm.) IN16 - $60 Fee
PSYC206 Adolescent Development (3 Credits)
PSY 206 Adolescent Development Three Credits The transitional years of human development from puberty to early adulthood. Emphasis is on developmental tasks and choices through which adolescents develop mastery and a sense of self-competence. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or 220 or admittance into the Teacher Education program. (Offered every semester.)
EDUC101 Introduction to Education (3 Credits)
EDUC280 Exceptional Child (3 Credits)
EDUC202 Cultural Awareness in the (3 Credits)
PSYC206 Adolescent Development (3 Credits)
EDUC280 Exceptional Child (3 Credits)
This course will examine the historical context, diverse characteristics, and individual planning for the exceptional child. Students in this course will explore how individuals develop and learn within the context of their cultural, linguistic, and academic experiences. Co-teaching instructional plans based on diverse student characteristics, student performance data, and curriculum goals will be developed. Thirsty hours of field experience in a special education classroom are required. Prerequisite: EDU 101. (Offered every semester.)
EDUC316 Read/Write Across Curriculums (3 Credits)
EDU 316 Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum Three Credits Emphasis is on teaching reading and writing in content areas from grades 6 through 12. Relationships between reading, literacy, and writing within content areas are established and ways of meeting the needs of culturally diverse and dysfunctional students are explored. Candidates design appropriate learning experiences and apply reading-study skills to the content areas. Field experiences required. Cross listed with ENG 316. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. (Offered fall semester.)
EDUC333 The Learning Environment (3 Credits)
This course will investigate the structures of a safe and healthy learning environment that facilitates cultural and linguistic responsiveness, positive social interaction, active engagement, and academic risk-taking. A three tiered level of positive behavior supports (PBS) will be explored as a framework for creating plans to accomplish a productive learning environment. Twenty hours of field experience required. Prerequisite: EDU280
EDUC340 Educational Measurement/Evaluation (3 Credits)
EDU 340 Educational Measurement and Evaluation Three Credits This course is designed to explore classroom evaluation of student growth as an integral part of instruction. Candidates explore the purpose of evaluation as it relates to planning instruction. Professional, social, ethical, and philosophical considerations related to teaching/learning are also explored. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. (Offered every semester.)
EDUC342 Middle School Curriculum/Instruct (3 Credits)
EDU 342 Middle School Curriculum and Instruction Three Credits A study of social and philosophical assumptions related to curricula, materials, and methods of instruction pertinent to middle school students. Focus is on organizing classes, making curricular decisions, determining methods and selecting learning resources. Field experiences required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. (Offered every semester.)
EDUC400 Early Professional Experience (1 Credit)
EDU 400 Early Experience One Credit After admission to the professional internship , candidates receive student teaching placements. Candidates work with their cooperating teachers during the first week of school. Five days of clinical experience required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Internship. (Offered fall semester)
EDUC409 Secondary Methods (3 Credits)
Teacher candidates work to integrate prior coursework experienced into the context of real classrooms. Teacher candidates develop a teaching philosophy and an operational "professional identity." Candidates consider the impact that various factors have on the learning environment, develop teaching strategies that promote active learning and which engage students with diverse abilities, cultures, and ethnicity. Candidates explore methods specific to their subject areas under the additional guidance of the program coordinator. Teacher candidates will engage in preparing for the edTPA. Candidates complete a minimum of 15 hours in the clinical setting completing pre-mini student teaching assignments. Students must take EDU409 and 410 (Offered Interterm) during the same academic year. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; EDU316, 333, and 340. (Offered fall semester.)
EDUC410 Secondary Methods Clinical Practice (3 Credits)
Candidates complete a mini-student teaching experience, consisting of 12 full days in the secondary classroom. Teacher candidates will meet on campus for a minimum of three class sessions. The course faculty member, assisted by the Director of Field Experience, will determine the placement for the clinical experience. Students must take EDU409 in the same academic year. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and EDU409. (Offered Interterm.)
EDUC421 Student Teaching/Secondary (8 Credits)
EDU 421 Secondary Student Teaching Seven* or Fifteen Credits Full semester of student teaching required for secondary education majors. *K-12 physical education majors are required to complete eight weeks of student teaching in conjunction with EDU 424. Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Internship. (Offered every semester.)
EDUC428 Secondary Programs Clinical Seminar (1 Credit)
The seminar addresses professional topics within the field of education and provides an opportunity for teacher candidates to focus on the required performance assessment. The performance assessment, aligned with state standards, is an authentic assessment tool that shows how teacher candidates develop and evaluate student learning. The portfolio documents practices in the areas of planning, instruction, assessment, analyzing teaching, and academic learning to reveal the impact of a candidate's teaching performance on student learning. This course is to be taken concurrently with student teaching and is pass/fail. Prerequisite: EDU410.
Specializastion
PSYC101 General Psychology (3 Credits)
This course introduces psychology as a science and emphasizes the interaction of social, cognitive, emotional, motivational, and organizational approaches to understanding human behavior. All students participate in a service learning experience (PSY101L) in which they apply course concepts in real world situations and organizations. Discussions within this class include Christian perspectives on current issues in human behavior, cognition, and motivation. Meets the general education psychology requirement. (Offered every semester in conjunction with PSY101L.) (A section of PSY101 H Honors: General Psychology is offered fall semester in odd calendar years for members of the Honors Program.)ss
SOCI101 Principles of Sociology (3 Credits)
SOC 101 Principles of Sociology Three Credits A basic course introducing the student to the concepts, theories, and methods employed in an objective scientific analysis of society, culture, social institutions and organizations, social control, deviancy, and social factors involved in personality development. (Offered every semester.)
PSYC101 General Psychology (3 Credits)
This course introduces psychology as a science and emphasizes the interaction of social, cognitive, emotional, motivational, and organizational approaches to understanding human behavior. All students participate in a service learning experience (PSY101L) in which they apply course concepts in real world situations and organizations. Discussions within this class include Christian perspectives on current issues in human behavior, cognition, and motivation. Meets the general education psychology requirement. (Offered every semester in conjunction with PSY101L.) (A section of PSY101 H Honors: General Psychology is offered fall semester in odd calendar years for members of the Honors Program.)
SOCI101 Principles of Sociology (3 Credits)
SOC 101 Principles of Sociology Three Credits A basic course introducing the student to the concepts, theories, and methods employed in an objective scientific analysis of society, culture, social institutions and organizations, social control, deviancy, and social factors involved in personality development. (Offered every semester.)
SOCI112 Intro To Anthropology (3 Credits)
The scientific study of humanity, human origins, fossil forms, and the evolution of material and non-material culture. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. Prerequisite: SOC 101 is recommended. (Offered spring semester.)
POLS210 American Government (3 Credits)
PSYC101 General Psychology (3 Credits)
This course uses film as a medium to examine a variety of topics normally found within the introductory psychology course, such as: psychopathology and therapy, sensation and perception, learning and memory, social dynamics, and personality. Students will view films and through readings, discussion, and lecture will explore how they illustrate psychological concepts. The primary question this course asks is "where did the movie get psychology right and where did it get it wrong?" To fully understand their psychological import, they will also be examined from the perspective of the viewer, director, and cultural era when the movie was first released. Meets the general education pshychology requirement.
SOCI112 Intro To Anthropology (3 Credits)
This three week course is aimed at taking students beyond the bounds of the traditional Introduction to Anthropology textbook into new areas of cultural learning and experience. Students will have the opportunity to go on several field trips to local social and historical sites to learn firsthand the principles behind cultural process and change. Cultural experts will also be brought into the class to share their experiences and offer challenging questions giving students and oral mode of cultural learning. Finally, by harnessing the power of media, students will be shown a series of short and feature length films that touch on relevant issues that can then be further discussed and critiqued within the context of the discussion group. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement.
HIST201 American History (3 Credits)
People, ideas, and institutions in American history from English colonization to the present. (Offered every semester.)
HIST202 Eastern Civilization (3 Credits)
The study of the history and culture of China and Japan from ancient times to the present. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. (Offered spring semester.)
POLS210 American Government (3 Credits)
Examines structures, functions, and policies of the national government. (Offered spring semester.)
HIST215 History Teaching Methods (3 Credits)
This course allows students the ability to practice and refine the skills necessary for successful secondary history instruction. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
HIST201 American History (3 Credits)
HIST310 Latin America (3 Credits)
Emphasizes the forces that shaped and are now reshaping the region. Examines historical reasons for the present problems that trouble the area. Cross listed with HIST110 and SPAN 310. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. (Offered fall semester.)
HIST350 Historical Methods (3 Credits)
Economics Elective - Complete One Course (Courses Required: 1)
ECON101 Survey of Economics (3 Credits)
This course will help students to produce enough to support themselves and family, consume resources and products wisely, provide for their own future needs, support government's appropriate role in our productivity, and consider the needs of their children, and enable them to live productive lives. (Offered fall semester.)
ECON201 Principles of Microeconomics (3 Credits)
The beginning of the one-year economics principles course, emphasizing profit maximizing for the firm, how government regulation affects business, and growth/environment questions. Moderate emphasis on mathematical analysis. Prereq: MTH 106 (Offered fall semester.)
ECON202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3 Credits)
For second year business students, emphasizing economic principles, national income, employment, inflation, and fiscal and monetary policy. Prerequisite: ECON 201. (Offered spring semester.)
ECON352 Modern Economic History (3 Credits)
An interdisciplinary course organized for studying backgrounds to current economic problems in context with related social, political, and religious issues. (Offered irregularly.)
ECON353 Environmental Economics (3 Credits)
Students will study two kinds of environmental issues: resource conservation and pollution of the environment. In both cases students will consider whether markets can achieve the best results for humankind, or whether stated intervention and control to keep us safe and healthy. Prerequisite: ECON201. (Offered irregularly.)
Geography Courses - Complete One Course (Courses Required: 1)
GEOG103 World Regional Geography (3 Credits)
Study of why the world works the way it does, how its unique regions have taken shape, and how those regions are increasingly interconnected. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
Amer History Upper Div - Choose 2 Courses from HIST304, 305, 307, 325 or 326 (Courses Required: 2)
HIST304 19th Century America (3 Credits)
This course examines American history and culture during this tumultuous century (roughly 1820-1900). The class examines the major social, religious, and political reforms of the century and the historical context in which they were born. Prerequisite: HST 201 and ENG 101. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
HIST305 20th Century America (3 Credits)
This course examines the development of U.S. social, cultural, and political history from World War I to the present. Prerequisite: HST 201 or permission of instructor. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
HIST307 Early American History (3 Credits)
This course examines the social, cultural and political development of the United States from colonization ro the early national period. Prerequisite: HST 201. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
HIST325 African American History (3 Credits)
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
HIST326 African American History (3 Credits)
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
Hist & Poli Sci Electives - Choose 3 Credit Hours of HIST, POLS, or SOCI (Credits Required: 3.00)
HIST101 Western Civilization (3 Credits)
The development of Western Civilization from the earliest civilizations in the Ancient Near East to the present, analyzing political, social, cultural, economic, and religious ideas and meaningfully applying them to contemporary life. (Offered every semester.)
SOCI103 Social Problems (3 Credits)
SOC 103 Social Problems Three Credits Expansion of awareness and knowledge of perceived social problems in American society. Problems studied include current social concerns such as alcoholism, drug addiction, mental illness, crime, violence, war, poverty, sexual deviancy, and population. (Offered irregularly.)
POLS120 Current Events (3 Credits)
SOCI125 International Development Theory (3 Credits)
SOCI171 Sociology: Language & Culture (3 Credits)
IN16 - Do you love languages? Did you know that for 300 years, no king of England spoke English? Do you know how many languages there are in the world? What a pidgin is? A creole? Are you familiar with language extinction? This course will provide a snapshot of the thousands of languages in today's world, and a whirlwind tour of how these languages are being buffeted and changed by modern life, and how they in turn are contributing to the quickly-changing modern world. It will also cover basic linguistics, the art of making human speech, and will give you options to learn some basic words and phrases in several languages, such as Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Hindi, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, Swahili, Russian, or languages of your choice. Meets Gen Ed sociology and CC (cross-cultural) credit. Fee - $15. This course will cover the fundamentals of sociology by focusing on the lenses of linguistics (the human capacity to make language), world languages (how languages are geographically organized and grouped into linguistic families), and culture (how languages affect the way people live and just about everything else - politics, war, religion, arts and music). Traditional sociological topics such as society, culture, ethnocentrism and cultural relativism, socialization, stratification, deviance, and minority relations will be studied through the fascinating history of how world languages developed and spread through conquest, colonialism, and trade relations. The supremacy of English as an international language will be briefly explored as a cultural phenomenon, but the focus will be on how English relates to local languages, and on resulting cultural sensitivities. As a side benefit, students will learn how to speak greetings and engage in basic everyday conversations in several languages - including Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, and South Korean, and will learn some "unique sounds" of these different languages and how they are formed by the human mouth, throat and larnyx. It should be fun as well as useful! Various language learning methodologies will also be reviewed and evaluated (and attempted!), and Christian ministries such as the Wycliffe Bible Translators will be examined along with various stories of cross-cultural exchange. IN14-Meets the general education sociology and cross-cultural requirements.
SOCI173 The Sociology of Money (3 Credits)
In this course we hope to discover if the Golden Rule really is .. he who has the gold makes the rules! We will also cover the fundamentals of sociology by tracing the cross-cultural influence of money and currency issues throughout human history and contemporary society. You will find out that people fight wars and get divorced over money, and world history can be understood through the lense of money. You will also learn how to budget and invest money, start a business, save for your wedding, first house, or (gasp) retirement. YouTube videos, music, and games are included as some fun learning methods. Take this course! It may make you wealthy in both knowledge and cash! (Two synchronous sessions are required each week, but there are two optional times per required session (AM and EVE), and recordings will be made available so that students can "make up" sessions missed.) Meets the general education sociology and cross-cultural requirements.
SOCI174 Sociology of Politics & Power (3 Credits)
SOCI177 Sociology: Music & Popular Culture (3 Credits)
This course will cover the fundamentals of sociology by focusing on music and popular culture through a cross-cultural perspective. Traditional sociological topics such as society, culture, socialization, stratification, deviance, and minority subcultures will be studied through a fascinating focus on world music, internet media, movies, and odd specimens of pop culture such as accordions, hoola hoops and pet rocks! Includes a requirement to attend at least two concerts or media events and submit sociological analysis and cross-cultural reflection. How crazy (and fun) can humans be? Come and find out! (Two synchronous sessions are required each week, but there are two optional times per required session (AM and EVE), and recordings will be made available so that students can "make up" sessions missed.) Meets the general education sociology and cross-cultural requirements.
HIST199 Open Titled (3 Credits)
POLS199 Open Titled (3 Credits)
SOCI202 Statistics (3 Credits)
SOC 202 Statistics Three Credits A study of basic concepts and operations in descriptive and inferential statistics. The areas of study will include graphic representations, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, and various significant tests of relationship, including measures of association, correlation, linear relationship, and means tests. This course includes an introduction to multivariate statistics and non-parametrics. Cross listed with PSY 202. Meets Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Offered every semester.)
SOCI203 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 Credits)
SOC 203 Introduction to Criminal Justice Three Credits An advanced survey course focusing on the description and interrelationships of the many agencies and institutions which comprise criminal justice; e.g., justice systems, law enforcement, corrections, etc. Agencies and institutions will be studied in their historical and social contexts, and will be further examined by way of major theories and models of criminal justice. The various professional implications of criminal justice will be examined. Cross listed with CRJ 201. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered spring semester.)
SOCI210 Research Methods (3 Credits)
SOC 210 Research Methods Three Credits A study of problem formulation, data collection, data analysis including descriptive and inferential statistical techniques, and research report writing. Includes two or more applied projects, usually in collaboration with the entire class or with a group, and the development of a publication-ready research paper. Prerequisites: SOC 101, 202 (may be taken concurrently). (Offered fall semester.)
HIST225 African American History (3 Credits)
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
HIST226 African American History (3 Credits)
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
HIST240 Social History of Latin America (3 Credits)
This course will focus on the histroical and contemporary conditions of ordinary people in Latin America. Besides written sources, we will make use of an important historical source, Latin America feature films, to illustrate how economic dependency and underdevelopment have conditioned the lives of hte continent's inhabitants, but also how Latin Americans have adapted and responded to these conditions. In addition, as social history, this course will focus on groups traditionally marginalized in the study of history: women, children, peasants, Indians, and others.
HIST245 Jews, Christians, Muslims (3 Credits)
A study of the history, culture and texts of Jews, Christians and Muslims based upon an examination of the significance of monotheism, Scripture, authority, ritual, family life, ethics, material culture, within each group. Observation of concepts and phenomena they share, as well as the ways they are distinguished for the purpose of understanding each group's origin, development, influence, and connection to civil/political orders. Cross listed with REL 245. Meets the general educaion cross cultural requirement. Prerequisite: COR 102 (may be taken concurrently) or Bible course or permission of instructor. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
HIST248 History of Mexico (3 Credits)
This course seeks to increase awareness of the uniqueness of Mexican culture, society, and politics and to promote an understanding of the forces driving changes in these areas. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. Prerequisite: HST101. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
HIST260 History of Philosophy I (3 Credits)
Major thinkers and themes of philosophical thought from Thales in the sixth century B.C.E., to the late fifteenth century medieval scholastics will be studied. Special attention will be given to the thought of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine and Thomas Aquinas and how these thinkers approached metaphysical, ontological, and ethical problems. Cross Listed with PHL250. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
HIST261 History of Philosophy II (3 Credits)
Major thinkers and themes of philosophical thought from Bacon through the twentieth century will be studied. Special attention will be given to epistemology and metaphysics. The perspectives of rationalism, empiricism, transcendental idealism, existentialism and twentieth century analytical thought will play a key role through this course. Cross listed with PHL251. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
SOCI301 Marriage & Family (3 Credits)
SOC 301 Marriage and Family Three Credits A study of courtship, marriage, and family in its historical development and many contemporary forms. Emphasis is placed on factors providing stability or stress to modern courtships and marriages. A combination of theoretical perspectives are used (sociological, psychological, anthropological, theological), and several professional and practical issues (parenting, financial planning, communication, divorce, etc.) are examined. Prerequisites: SOC 101, 112, PSY 101, or SWK 205. (Offered spring semester.)
SOCI302 Diversity Issues (3 Credits)
The status of "minority group" is defined and dominant-subdominant relationships in society are examined. The value and challenges of diversity in a pluralistic society are presented. An emphasis is placed on the social factors traditionally included under diversity (e.g. race, ethnicity, deviant lifestyles), and non-traditional factors (religion, social class, geographic setting, etc.). Techniques for resolving problems as well as patterns of adaptation are considered. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. (Offered irregularly.)
SOCI303 Crime and Social Deviancy (3 Credits)
SOC 303 Crime and Social Deviancy Three Credits A social and social psychological approach to the study of disvalued persons and behavior. Theoretical approaches to causes and control of deviant behavior are studied with a major emphasis placed on crime and criminals. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of the instructor. (Offered fall semester of even calendar years.)
HIST304 19th Century America (3 Credits)
This course examines American history and culture during this tumultuous century (roughly 1820-1900). The class examines the major social, religious, and political reforms of the century and the historical context in which they were born. Prerequisite: HST 201 and ENG 101. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
SOCI304 Social Psychology (3 Credits)
This course presents an introduction to Social Psychology by exploring theories and research related to social perceptions, social influence, and social relations. Major topics to be covered in the course include, but are not limited to, social influence processes, interpersonal attraction, group behavior, aggression, conformity, and attitude formation and change. Students will further explore these topics by designing and conducting a social psychological research project. Cross listed with SOC304. Prerequisites: PSY 101, SOC 101, PSY or SOC 202, and PSY 210 or SOC 210. (Offered fall semester.)
HIST305 20th Century America (3 Credits)
This course examines the development of U.S. social, cultural, and political history from World War I to the present. Prerequisite: HST 201 or permission of instructor. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
HIST307 Early American History (3 Credits)
This course examines the social, cultural and political development of the United States from colonization ro the early national period. Prerequisite: HST 201. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
SOCI309 Sociology of Wealth and Poverty (3 Credits)
In this course, students will study and contrast the rich and the poor, the powerful and the powerless, the haves and the have-nots. More importantly, it asks important questions such as "Why does such inequality exit in every known society?" It then builds a frame of reference from which to view the social and personal meanings of structured, legitimized social inequality, and to explore Christian responses to injustice and inequity in the world. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
POLS310 The U. S. Constitution (3 Credits)
An introduction to the philosophical, social, historical, and legal aspects of the U. S. Constitution through case study to prepare students for political/legal research on contemporary issues. Prerequisite: POL 210, shoudl be taken concurrently with HST 201. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
POLS311 History Of Political Thought (3 Credits)
Concerns political ideas from Plato to the present, analyzed from the perspective of the Judeo-Christian-Classical tradition. Cross listed with PHL 311. Prerequisite: POL 210. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
SOCI311 Human Sexuality (3 Credits)
This course examines theoretical and conceptual issues, empirical research, and social policies germane to human sexuality. Students should be aware that while this course may prompt them to think about their own sexuality more systematically, the course is not designed to be a "personal growth" experience. Instead, students should expect to approach sexuality more analytically and to develop a sociological and social psychological understanding of the diverse issues covered in this course. Prerequisites: SOC 101 and 301 or permission of instructor. (Offered fall semester of even calendar years.)
POLS313 International Relations (3 Credits)
A study of the foreign policy of the United States from Teddy Roosevelt to George W. Bush. Prereq: HST 201. (Offered fall semester of even calender years).
POLS320 Current Events (3 Credits)
HIST325 African American History (3 Credits)
African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.
HIST326 African American History (3 Credits)
African American History II (1860-1970) examines the halting progress Americans made during the 100 years between the Emancipation Proclamation and the civil rights legislation of the 1960's. Students consider the perspective of significant American civil rights activists, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, Anna Julia Cooper, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
POLS340 Civil Rights and Liberties (3 Credits)
HIST340 Social History of Latin America (3 Credits)
HIST343 Western Christianity I (3 Credits)
The systematic study of the development of Western Christendom from the first through the fifteenth centuries focusing on major themes, figures, actions, and impulses. The historical method of research will be employed as a means of helping students to gain a contextualized understanding and appreciation for the developing role of the church and its relationship to culture. A major emphasis will be placed on the reading of primary sources as a means for understanding the development of Christian theology. Cross listed with REL 343. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)
HIST344 Western Christianity II (3 Credits)
The systematic study of the development of Western Christendom from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries focusing on major themes, figures, actions, and impulses. The historical method of research will be employed as a means of helping students to gain a contextualized understanding and appreciation for the developing role of the church and its relationship to culture. A major emphasis will be placed on the reading of primary sources as a means for understanding the development of Christian theology. Cross listed with REL 344. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
HIST345 History of Judaism (3 Credits)
A study of the Jewish religion/culture that developed in the sixth century BCE and flourished in the Persian, Greek and Roman periods. Includes encounters with the rabbinic literature that began to be produced in the second centruy CE--the Midrashim, Mishanah and Talmuds--and modern expressions of Judaism around the world. Cross listed with REL 345. Prerequisite: COR 102 or Bible course or permission of the instructor. (Offered spring semester.)
HIST348 History of Mexico (3 Credits)
This course seeks to increase awareness of the uniqueness of Mexican culture, society, and politics and to promote an understanding of the forces driving changes in these areas. Meets the general educastion cross cultural requirement. Prerequisite: HST101 and a History major. (Offered spring semster of even calendar years.)
SOCI351 Juvenile Delinquency (3 Credits)
SOC 351 Juvenile Delinquency Three Credits A course designed to investigate delinquency, including juvenile deviancy and juvenile crime. Applicable theories and models of delinquency will be investigated, as will social construction of delinquency. The course is appropriate for students focusing on criminal justice generally, as well as social work. Professional implications will also be examined. Cross listed with SWK 351. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
HIST352 Modern Economic History (3 Credits)
An interdisciplinary course organized for studying backgrounds to current economic problems in context with related social, political, and religious issues. Meets the general education cross cultural requirement. (Offered irregularlyfall semester of odd calendar years.)
HIST353 History of Russia (3 Credits)
This course examines the development of Russian poitics, religion and culture from the prehistoric period to the present. This allows study of a culture which is connected to the European societies with which students are familiar, but which has been strikingly different in may ways. Prerequisite: HST 101. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
SOCI360 Sociology Of Cities (3 Credits)
SOC 360 Sociology of Cities Three Credits ( CC ) This course allows students to study the city as a unique form of social organization and as the highest and most complex product of human civilization. Students will learn about the historical development of cities in global perspective, about the current state of urban affairs, and about the complex interdependencies of ecological, economic, and social systems. One field trip to a nearby city will allow students to see urban systems in action. Meets the general education cross-cultural requirement. Prerequisite: SOC 101, 112, PSY 101, or SWK 205. (Offered fall semester every three years.)
SOCI361 Policies and Agencies (3 Credits)
The study of a variety of social organizations and of the policies enacted or pursued related to mission, structure, and soical-political environments. Governmental and non-governmental agencies in the areas of social work and criminal justices will be included. Using organizational theory and real-life models, students will engage in institutional problem-solving exercises. Cross listed with CRJ 362 and DWK 362. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
SOCI365 Social Organization (3 Credits)
SOC 365 Social Organization Three Credits A study of the types of organizational patterns occurring in Western Society, their origin, functions, and structure. The place of the individual in an impersonal organizational system is examined. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)
SOCI380 Social Theory (3 Credits)
SOC 380 Sociological Theory Three Credits ( WI ) The development of major schools of social thought, major social theorists and their distinctive contributions to the understanding of the society, culture, and modernity, are considered and analyzed. Requires three of four major papers which focus respectively on social philosophers of antiquity, the major founders of sociological theory, modern social theories and theoretical trends and everyday applications of social theory. Also covers how to write a "literature review" for a research paper. Meets the general education writing-intensive requirement. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semester.)
SOCI381 Social Context/Community Develop (3 Credits)
SOC 381 Social Context for Community Development Three Credits The different bases for healthy communities are explored, with emphasis on anthropological, sociological and biblical models of community. This will include how to revitalize communities which suffer from various problems with complex social causes, such as those with high rates of poverty, unemployment, illiteracy, criminal activity, welfare dependancy or social service delivery, spiritual apathy and even war and refugeeism. A practical emphasis on community-building programs, policies or advocacy is included. Key field trip experiences will link class participants with practitioners in the field. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.)
SOCI385 Sociology Of Religion (3 Credits)
Students will learn about a variety of American and international religions and religious movements and how these are shaped by culture. Students will contrast the theoretical perspectives of Durkheim, Weber, Marx, and the social constructionists and will study the reciprocal influence of religion and culture, or stated differently, the influence of religion and social structures on each other. Students will also be challenged to examine the cultural underpinnings of their own faith. Prerequisite: SOC 101, 112, PSY 101, or SWK 205.. (Offered irregularly.)
HIST399 Open Titled (3 Credits)
POLS399 Open Titled (3 Credits)
HIST451 Historiography (3 Credits)
Historiography is the analysis of the theories through which we have understood history.

Career Opportunities

  • High School History Teacher