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Forensics Minor

Core Course Requirements

BIOL155 Crime Scene Investigation (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the world of crime scene investigation and forensic criminalistics. Students will learn from actual cases and hear lectures from lead investigators about the science of crime scene investigation. Lab exercises will engage the students in the biological, chemical and physical analysis of evidence, including several crime scene scenarios. Three hours lecture and optional two hours lab each week. Students enrolling in and successfully completing the lab portion of this class will receive four credits; students not enrolled in the lab will receive three credits for the class. To take the lab, students must be concurrently enrolled in the lecture part of the class. Meets the general education laboratory science requirement. (Offered spring semester of even calendar years.) Corequisite: BIOL 155L

CHEM111 General Chemistry I (4 Credits)

Basic principles of chemical reactions and descriptive chemistry are integrated in terms of atomic structure, bonding theory, molecular geometry, reaction rates, equilibrium, and thermodynamics. Meets the general education laboratory science requirement. (Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.) (Offered fall semester.) Corequisite: CHEM 111L

CRJS203 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 Credits)

An advanced survey course focusing on the description and interrelationships of the many agencies and institutions which comprise criminal justice; e.g., justice systems, law enforcement, corrections, etc. Agencies and institutions will be studied in their historical and social contexts and will be further examined by way of major theories and models of criminal justice. The various professional implications of criminal justice will be examined. (Offered spring semester.)

Choose One

- Choose PSYC 101 or SOCI 101 (Courses Required: 1)

PSYC101 General Psychology (3 Credits)

This course introduces psychology as a science and emphasizes the interaction of social, cognitive, emotional, motivational, and organizational approaches to understanding human behavior. All students participate in a service learning experience in which they apply course concepts in real world situations and organizations. Discussions within this class include Christian perspectives on current issues in human behavior, cognition, and motivation.

SOCI101 Principles of Sociology (3 Credits)

A basic course introducing the student to the concepts, theories, and methods employed in an objective scientific analysis of society, culture, social institutions and organizations, social control, deviancy, and social factors involved in personality development. Meets the general education social science or business management requirement. (Offered every semester.)

Choose Three Courses

- Choose three courses (Courses Required: 3)

ARTD241 Digital Photography I (3 Credits)

Students will work with traditional 35 mm and digital cameras and scanners to produce photographic images that can be improved, manipulated, altered, and printed from the computer. They will learn to control camera settings, adjust imagery using sophisticated photo manipulation software, and explore the variety of digitally based, photograph quality printing. Students will experiment with the fundamentals of photography while developing a portfolio of creative photography. Meets the general education creative and performing arts requirement. (Offered fall semester.)

BIOL150 Medical Terminology (2 Credits)

A self-directed study of medical terminology which covers basic roots, prefixes, suffixes and terminology of different systems of the human body. Students prepare for periodic vocabulary tests on their own time and schedule. The object of the course is to prepare the student for entrance into health fields by providing a review of vocabulary tools. Prerequisite: Three BIOL classes. (Offered online.)

BIOL245 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 Credits)

This course is designed to deal with all the human body systems as to structure and function. Material covered is intended for those planning to teach biology in high school or enter the allied health professions. (Three lectures and one two-hour lab per week.) (Offered fall semester) Corequisite: BIOL 245L

BIOL246 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4 Credits)

A continuation of BIOL 245. (Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.) Prerequisite: BIOL 245. (Offered spring semester.) Corequisite: BIOL 246L

BIOL314 Biochemistry I (4 Credits)

This course is a survey of the chemical reactions in living systems. The general biochemistry including a detailed look at DNA, transcription, translation, protein synthesis, lipid metabolism (e.g., cholesterol synthesie) and amino acide and nucleic acid metabolism will be studied. (Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.) Cross listed with CHM 314. Prerequisite: CHM 201 or concurrent enrollment. (Offered fall semester.)

BIOL346 Human Dissection I (2 Credits)

This course provides the student with a greater appreciation of the human anatomy through the hands on approach of examining the form and function of the human body at a gross level. The student will acquire knowledge of the anatomy and functions of the upper and lower limbs as well as the facial and neck regions. Participants will have the opportunity to dissect and explore anatomical features of interest. Prerequisite: BIOL 245 and students will need to apply and be accepted to enroll in this course. Offered fall semester.

BIOL347 Human Dissection II (2 Credits)

This course provides the student with a greater appreciation of the human anatomy through the hands on approach of examining the form and function of the human body at a gross level. The student will acquire knowledge of the anatomy and functions of the thorax, abdomen, pelvis and lower limb, including structural contents. Participants will have the opportunity to dissect and explore anatomical features of interest. Prerequisite: BIOL 245 and students will need to apply and be accepted to enroll in this course. Offered Spring semester.

CHEM201 Organic Chemistry I (4 Credits)

A two-tiered approach to organic chemistry is taken. CHEM 201 is a one semester survey of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. Basic structure, bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, properties, and reactions of organic molecules are examined. The second course (CHEM 301) covers the same topics, but to a much greater extent and theoretical depth. Major emphasis is placed on reaction mechanisms and much new material is covered, especially in the areas of spectroscopy, bonding theory, and structure/property relationships. (Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.) Prerequisite: CHEM 112. Cerequisite: CHEM 201L. (Offered fall semester.)

CHEM301 Organic Chemistry II (4 Credits)

A continuation of CHM 201. (Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.) Prerequisite: CHM 201 or equivalent. (Offered spring semester.)

CHEM314 Biochemistry I (4 Credits)

This course is a survey of the chemical reactions in living systems. The general biochemistry including a detailed look at DNA, transcription, translation, protein synthesis, lipid metabolism (e.g., cholesterol synthesis) and amino acid and nucleic acid metabolism will be studied. (Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.) Prerequisite: CHEM 201 or concurrent enrollment. Corequisite: CHEM 314L. (Offered fall semester.)

CHEM342 Instrumental Analysis (4 Credits)

This course covers the major types of instrumentation utilized in Chemistry, Biology and Physics by providing "hands-on" experience as well as emphasizing the underlying principles. (Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.) Cross listed with BIOL 341. Prerequisite: CHEM 112, and PHYS 200. Chemistry 201 recommended. Corequisite: CHEM 342L. (Offered spring semester of odd calendar years.)

CRJS304 Criminal Justice Community Relation (3 Credits)

This course helps students to recognize the importance of the criminal justice system and community working cooperatively towards a more successful criminal justice system. Moving towards community trust of, and cooperation with, the Criminal Justice system will aid in the overall success of the criminal justice system in working towards safe and inclusive communities. Some topics that will be covered include community policing philosophy, applications, issues, types, and contemporary research. The course will also consider different community policing models. This course will include a $50 course fee for a travel component where students are able to see an example of a community policing model when the course is taught face to face. Meets the general education global foundations requirement. Prerequisite: CRJS 203.

CRJS310 Advanced Law Enforcement Admin (3 Credits)

In this course students will learn what is required to provide ethical and effective leadership within a law enforcement agency while building trust between citizens and police officers. The course will examine various policing strategies and the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy. You will also learn about the basic administrative responsibilities required of any law enforcement agency including planning, budgeting, organizational design, and assessment. We will also examine the important area of human resource management concerning the recruiting and hiring of personnel. Lastly, you will come to understand the concepts and principles that are essential in leading others in a way that inspires them to want to follow you.

CRJS315 Introduction to Crisis Management (3 Credits)

Organizations today face evolving and diverse forms of crises that can quickly escalate because of advancements in technology, the global economy, and the international and social media's reach. Attacks from individuals in other countries can bring an organization's operations to a standstill or attract negative publicity. To effectively cope with these threats, organizational leaders need to increase the complexity and sophistication of their crisis management capabilities. As a result, when faced with a crisis and thrust on a global stage with the whole world watching to see how they respond, these leaders find themselves defensive, reactive, and unable to perform in the heat of a crisis. An organizational crisis is a test of the capacity and character of an organization and its leaders. The economic, reputational, and social costs for organizations are high if they fail the test, and the consequences for those affected by the crisis can be catastrophic.

CRJS361 Policies and Agencies (3 Credits)

The study of a variety of social organizations and of the policies enacted or pursued related to mission, structure, and social work and criminal justice will be included. Using organizational theory and real-life models, students will engage in institutional problem-solving exercises. Cross listed with SCWK 361. Meets the general education upper division writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOCI 101. (Offered fall semester of odd calendar years.)

CRJS399 Open Titled (3 Credits)
PSYC212 Developmental Psychology (3 Credits)

This course will acquaint students with the major themes, theories and theorists in the field of human lifespan developmental psychology. Lifespan development is the scientific study of human development from conception to death. This course focuses on biological, cognitive, social, emotional, cultural, and religious aspects of human development, and aims to help students gain an understanding of human development across the lifespan. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC304 Social Psychology (3 Credits)

This course presents an introduction to Social Psychology by exploring theories and research related to social perceptions, social influence, and social relations. Major topics to be covered in the course include, but are not limited to, social influence processes, interpersonal attraction, group behavior, aggression, conformity, and attitude formation and change. Students will further explore these topics by designing and conducting a social psychological research project. Cross listed with SOC304. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, PSYC 202, and PSYC 210. Cross-Listed as: SOCI 304.

PSYC310 Psychology of Personality (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to the major schools of theory in the field of Personality Psychology. Research on the physiological processes that underlie the phenomenon of personality with also be addressed. Students discuss the assumptions of each orientation; each student clarifies his or her own value system and foundation in faith with respect to the theories covered. A comprehensive model of personality is created by students. Meets the general education upper divisions writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite: PSYC 101

PSYC315 Introduction to Counseling (3 Credits)

Current theories of psychological counseling and the techniques commonly used in therapy are the basis for this course. Students engage in structured peer-counseling in order to practice beginning counseling skills and to develop a personal counseling style. Special emphasis is given to examining how faith and values influence the theory and practice of counseling. Prerequisite: PSYC 310

PSYC399 Open Titled (3 Credits)

Practicum/Internship

(Credits Required: 2.00)

CRJS405 Practicum (1 Credit)

Each student must successfully complete one or more practicum experiences totaling 3-9 hours of academic credit, where 40 clock hours on location equals one hour of credit. Ideally each practicum should be based on a criminal justice related agency (court, probation office, correctional facility, local police station or sheriff's department, etc.), which specializes in some aspect of the criminal justice system. However, agencies or practices that heavily intersect with the criminal justice system, or some aspect of the criminal justice system will also be considered. Ideally an on-site supervisor with an appropriate degree or license will supervise the student's practicum. Additionally, Greenville University requires upper division status for students to participate in internships/practicums.

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